Video Editor Resume Example

Splice together the best parts of your career to create a stellar resume sure to wow hiring managers!

Katerina Frye
Written by Katerina Frye • Last updated on Mar 30, 2021
Video Editor Resume Example
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Do you love movies, music, and animated effects? Video Editors work with footage and sound to create stories for social media, website content, or films. 

According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, the job outlook for Video Editors is growing at 18% — which is considered to be much faster than average!

Even so, you still need a stellar resume to help you stand apart from the crowd. 

In this article, we’ll discuss

  1. Which format is right for your resume
  2. How to write a resume summary 
  3. Describing your work experience and skills
  4. Including your education 
  5. Listing your certifications
  6. Choosing the right template

1. Choose the Right Format for a Video Editor Resume

The first step to drafting your resume is deciding which resume format to use. This depends on your career experience, specialties, and skills. 

You have 3 main options for resume formats:

  1. Reverse-Chronological: With this structure, place your most recent jobs first, followed by the next most recent job, and ending with your oldest position. Most resumes use this format. 
Tip: Only include jobs relevant to the position to which you’re applying to, so leave out any former jobs that don’t fit.
  1. Functional: This format lists your specific skills and qualifications, with less focus on the chronology of your work experience. This format is best for people who have no work experience or have been out of the workforce for a while, perhaps because they had to care for children or an elderly parent, and have lapses in their work history as a result
  1. Hybrid / Combination: This format is a mix of both Functional and Reverse-Chronological. It provides more detailed work experience descriptions that would typically be seen in the latter, while still offering a bulleted list of skills as seen in the former.  
Tip: When in doubt, choose the Reverse-Chronological resume format. 

For a Video Editor, hiring managers want to glance at your resume and get a sense of the following:

  • Knowledge of editing software
  • Familiarity with creating both short-form daily content and long-form series
  • Experience using camera equipment

The best format for a Video Editor is the Reverse-Chronological resume format, as you want to show employers the progression of your skills and work history as you’ve become more experienced in your field.  

2. Write a Strong Video Editor Resume Summary

Hiring Managers spend 6 seconds on each resume. 

In order to capture their interest, incorporate a summary into your resume. 

A resume summary is one or two sentences at the top of your paper that summarizes your entire resume. It’s the punch line that keeps the resume reviewer reading.

For a Video Editing career, include the following points in your summary:

  • Years of experience
  • Mention a noteworthy project you’ve been involved in or any specialties you have, such as editing sports games, famous wedding footage, movies, or social media content; or the name of a highbrow client
  • An adjective or two conveying your personality, such as “speedy,” “meticulous,” “professional,” “multi-tasker” or “detail-oriented”
  • Mention technologies or software in which you’re an expert
Here is an example of a bad resume summary:
Experienced Video Editor with storytelling skills and knowledge of editing software.

Why is this bad? It’s vague, for one. Two, it reads more like a job description than a summary — shouldn’t all Video Editors have storytelling abilities and software skills? 

Here is an example of a good resume summary: 
Detail-oriented Video Editor with 8 years of experience editing commercials and social media videos using Final Cut Pro. Familiarity with camera operations to enhance storytelling and align with the product’s vision.

Why is this good? It’s very specific. It mentions software names like Final Cut Pro and specialties like commercials and social media. It also tells the reader about you; you’re “detail-oriented.” Lastly, this summary shows hiring managers that you can also work behind the camera itself. 

For more information, checkout our guide on writing a killer resume summary.

3. Relevant Work Experience & Skills for Video Editors

The next step to drafting your resume is to list your work experience. This includes the name of your position (e.g., Senior Video Editor, Assistant Video Editor), the name of the location at which you worked, and the length of time in which you worked. 

Furthermore, write your resume experience in a way that anyone in your industry will understand. Don't use company-specific language.

Also, make sure to quantify your achievements. Showing your achievements demonstrates to employers that you'll be able to make considerable impact at your next company.

For example, if a place you previously worked at called B-Roll footage “transitional pieces,” go with the more common term, otherwise a hiring manager may not know what you’re talking about.

If the manager is confused, they’re more likely to skip past your resume.

Examples of Work History for Video Editors

Video Editor, Digital Spark Studios
Augusta, ME • January 2019 — Present

  • Worked with marketing team to draft storyboards for 14 commercials
  • Edited 17 commercials for products ranging from insurance to bread
  • Assigned tasks to assistant editors and interns to increase production efficiency
  • Added voice-overs to 2 short documentaries
  • Trimmed shots using Final Cut Pro and edited filmed content to align with product vision
  • Finished products within financial and time constraints, saving clients 13% of their budget on average 
  • Evaluated and selected shots for pacing and theme continuity

Assistant Video Editor, Sweet Kiss Studios
Portland, ME • October 2015 — December 2018

  • Used DVD Studio Pro and Avid Media Composer to sequence and trim videos, catered to clients' vision and the products' purpose
  • Incorporated B-Roll footage to streamline video transitions
  • Operated camera and production equipment during staffing shortages
  • Examined frames to mark all sound beginning and ending points
  • Ensured accuracy of film serial numbers and time codes
  • Sourced and added soundtracks for 3 finished films
  • Supported media campaigns for the films by creating short promotional videos and movie trailers
  • Ensured edited videos and films were mistake-free and made corrections when needed

Video Editor, Bashful Beauties 
San Jose, CA • March 2013 — October 2015

  • Produced weekly video blogs for Facebook and Instagram centering on beauty content
  • Improved viewership of content by 25%
  • Re-sequenced existing videos and updated soundtracks to better reflect products' vision
  • Captured studio-quality photographs for social media and long-form videos for YouTube
  • Collaborated with marketing personnel to create storyboards and content plans
  • Designed visual effects for post-production pieces using Photoshop and After Effects

In addition your work history, take it one step further by adding your relevant skills:

  • Communication Skills
  • Detail-Oriented
  • Creative
  • Organized
  • Camera Direction 
  • Crew Instruction
  • Trimming
  • Sculpting
  • Transcription
  • Real time edits
  • Video music editing
  • News editing
  • Voice over editing
  • Organizing and backing up footage
  • Graphic Design
  • Animation

If you want to learn how to nail this section, read our guide on the proper way to include skills and work history on your resume.

4. Include an Education Section 

When listing your education on your resume, most companies may require that Video Editors have a bachelor's degree in a field related to film or broadcasting, such as communications, film studies, or production.

This entails a mix of classroom learning and hands-on work with software and camera equipment. 

Software and technology form the backbone of this career, and it’s important to list a few on your resume. Here are some examples to get you started:

  • Premiere Pro
  • Adobe Creative Suite
  • Final Cut Pro
  • Avid Media Composer
  • Soundtrack Pro
  • DVD Studio Pro
  • Blender
  • Illustrator
  • GoLive CS2
  • Movavi Video Editor Plus
  • PowerDirector365
  • Corel VideoStudio Ultimate
  • Pinnacle Studio
  • Hitfilm Express
  • Adobe Premiere Elements
  • Nero Video

You can name these in under the “Skills” section or drop them periodically in your work experience.

For example:

• Used Soundtrack Pro to add 20 minutes of music to a nature documentary about orangutans.

Additionally, many jobs require Video Editors to submit a portfolio of their work. The purpose of a portfolio is to provide an employer with visual examples of your work, so include your strongest pieces.

Consider stocking your portfolio with samples from college, or internships, independent work, or previous jobs. 

 5. Mention Certifications Relevant to the job

Some companies will accept Video Editors who learned through certifications rather than a college degree. Popular programs include the American Graphics Institute Video Editor Certification

For those who already have formal training in video editing, certifications show employers that you are expanding on your skills and diversifying your portfolio. Not only are you more knowledgeable, but you’re also more employable. 

Certification programs include:

For more information on certifications, check out our guide on how to include certifications on your resume the right way.

6. Pick the right template

Now it’s time for the fun part — picking the aesthetics of your resume! 

Here at EasyResume, we offer 4 different templates. 

  • Creative: these resumes are bold and colorful with eye-catching fonts to help you stand out from the crowd. This is best for those in creative fields like marketing and art. 
  • Simple: these resumes follow a clear, straightforward format that highlight you and your experiences. This is best for those in fields that prefer austerity, such as the healthcare and finance industries. 
  • Modern: these resumes have sleek designs that are fresh and bold with elegant fonts and clean lines. This is best for individuals applying to startups or to companies with a young audience or product.
  • Professional: these resumes have a clean, crisp look that incorporates only one or two accent colors. The focus is solely on the text, pulling the recruiter into your experiences and accomplishments. This is best for individuals applying to straight-laced companies that mandate a suit-and-tie dress code. 

Your resume template should reflect the job to which you’re applying.

For Video Editors, try a Creative or Modern format to keep the focus on your skills while still creating a stylish resume.

7. Takeaways

We’ve done it! 

Almost. 

Now it’s time to put the pieces together, just like you do with video footage. 

Here’s what you need to do: 

  • Research the job description to locate keywords
  • Use a Reverse-Chronological resume layout
  • Write your resume summary, including your special projects and years of experience
  • Include your education, software knowledge, and relevant certifications
  • Write your experience section in a way that any outsider could understand. Talk more about the how and why of your responsibilities. Quantify your results.
  • Pick a resume template, like Creative, that fits the position to which you’re applying.

To save time, start with one of our resume examples. 

You’ll be on your way to splicing together the next Hollywood blockbuster in no time!

Browse more resume templates that fit your role

Katerina Frye
With a background in Psychology and Marketing, Katerina devotes her time to understand people, their careers, and their goals to help them succeed. She also has experience in social media, science writing, and fiction. When she isn't writing, she's hitting the gym, playing with her cats, or eating chocolate.
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